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20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
it be civil rights, whether it be, you know workplace safety, you know, how long you work every week, these kind of things are all things that were implemented from the top down and nobody here's going to say that the 40-hour work week was a bad idea. nobody's going to say that. that... that you know people of color can now vote. nobody's going to say that. it just, out of were they very, very popular things when they came out? no, they were not. voting right, voting rights act, civil rights act were very... very vilified in many parts of the country. but the idea that you know obamacare is not the answer, it probably isn't, but something has to be done about this problem and if you don't do anything, which is going to keep ballooning this thing. >> obamacare scares me, you know. i don't want the government knowing my personal issues or my healthcare. i don't want them to tell me that i can't go to a-- my own doctor. and right now my family physician has a sign in the window that says, no obamacare. i'm scared. >> reporter: go ahead, chastity. >> but i think at the end of the day gov
and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you can see the economy improving bit by bit by middle class people aren't doing that much better. people at the top are doing real well. corporations are reporting profits, but the people in the middle aren't doing that well. back in the old days tbhak the heyday of the middle class, everybody sharedded in that prosperity. today everybody doesn't share in that prosperity. that's why so many people feel so much pain. >> suarez: you take us again and again in the book to key moments where things could have gone
, georgia congressman and civil rights icon john lewis compared some voter i.d. statutes to literacy tests and poll taxes that kept blacks from voting for years in the south. >> i've seen this before. i lived this before. too many people struggled, suffered, and died to make this possible for every american to exercise their right to vote. ( applause ) >> suarez: nationwide pennsylvania is now one of 33 states with voter identification laws. it's one of five states with strict photo i.d. laws. the statutes have spawnd at least 15 legal challenges over everything from voter i.d. to early voting to culling voter rolls. in florida, the state republican party has filed a fraud complaint against the company it hired to register voters. as of friday at least 10 counties have spotted possibly fraudulent forms turned in by the firm. back in pennsylvania another eye peel to the state supreme court remains possible. in the meantime, the new rules have already been modified, prompting new coalitions to form with the aim of helping voters navigate the confusion. for more on how voter i.d. for more on
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)